About Carolina Proaño-Castro

I am an ecuadorian biologist and a sustainability professional with expertise in biodiversity conservation, climate change, sustainable development and scientific research. In 2008, I was awarded a BSc in Biological Sciences from Pontificia Universidad Catolica (Ecuador), and I later gained an MA in International Affairs and Environmental Sustainability from Ohio University (US). As it is, I am currently a student at the Conservation Leadership Programme at the University of Cambridge (UK) gaining skills in the management and economic side of conservation, as well as establishing a high-profile network of professionals, academics and aspiring conservation leaders. I have strong qualitative and quantitative analysis knowledge with excellent communication and facilitation skills. My greatest strengths lie in conveying complex technical concepts to broad audiences, developing and implementing effective project-based strategic plans, and building consensus among a diverse range of stakeholders in multicultural and multisectoral settings. I have been actively involved in conservation of biodiversity since the year 2004 and I have experienced and lived it on very different scales. First, as a scientist studying the biodiversity of insects of the cloud forest and other ecosystems in Ecuador, and later as a development practitioner understanding the links between conservation, health and development in rural communities. I developed tailored environmental education and social entrepreneurship programmes for children and youth from rural areas. Lately, I have been working at the science-policy interface, supporting governments in Latin America to build inclusive, low carbon and resilient public policies. I believe I have a holistic, inclusive and current understanding of what conservation is both in theory and practice, as well as where future developments may lead. In my future career, I envision conservation solutions that are well articulated with other sectors, other disciplines so that the whole impact of conservation is more than the sum of parts….

Advice for getting your dream job in conservation science

A great post! check it out!

ConservationBytes.com

people management

A few weeks ago I heard from an early-career researcher in the U.S. who had some intelligent things to say about getting jobs in conservation science based on a recent Conservation Biology paper she co-wrote. Of course, for all the PhDs universities are pumping out into the workforce, there will never be enough positions in academia for them all. Thus, many find their way into non-academic positions. But – does a PhD in science prepare you well enough for the non-academic world? Apparently not.

Many post-graduate students don’t start looking at job advertisements until we are actually ready to apply for a job. How often do we gleam the list of required skills and say, “If only I had done something to acquire project management skills or fundraising skills, then I could apply for this position…”? Many of us start post-graduate degrees assuming that our disciplinary training for that higher degree will…

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Las mujeres del mangle por Gabriela Muñoz Vélez

Les comparto un articulo lindísimo de la Gaby Muñoz Vélez….

 

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“Las mujeres esmeraldeñas se han dedicado tradicionalmente a conchar. Esta labor se ha convertido en su principal actividad económica, pero de un tiempo a esta parte, la escasez del molusco se ha convertido en un problema serio para las comunidades rurales de la zona fronteriza costera entre Ecuador y Colombia. […]”

y aquí pueden leer el artículo completo!

 

 

Acción sobre la vulnerabilidad climática: Lecciones de Quito

Les comparto mi último artículo: historias-por-dentro-quito….

Mensajes clave

● La ciudad de Quito es un buen ejemplo de cómo la información sobre la vulnerabilidad, puede generar conocimiento en el desarrollo de políticas e implementación de acciones concretas sobre el terreno. Quito ha demostrado que desarrollar indicadores a escala de ciudad y preguntas clave relativas a las políticas de una manera participativa, involucrando a las autoridades locales, expertos locales y apoyo externo, puede construir confianza y facilitar la apropiación institucional de la información generada.

● La evidencia de la vulnerabilidad de Quito se ha legitimado y se ha asumido efectivamente dentro del Distrito Metropolitano de Quito por dos razones principales: la metodología y los resultados finales respondieron a la demanda, necesidades y prioridades del Municipio; y sus autoridades técnicas fueron participantes activos en el proceso y no sólo receptores de la información.

● Quito mejoró la aplicación práctica de las soluciones de adaptación al cambio climático in situ, mediante la identificación de opciones que tomen en cuenta la diversidad de opiniones y fuentes de evidencia, así como la comprensión individual tanto de mujeres como de hombres ante la vulnerabilidad al cambio climático.

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Urban Agriculture and biodiversity

Did you know that recent studies show that urban ecosystems present a higher richness of species than intensively managed agricultural ecosystems?  This could suggest that the conditions in the cities are giving these species a place to live without the threats of pesticides, disturbance from machinery or clear cuts after harvesting… isn’t that great? our cities are giving biodiversity a home!

With a growing population, the food demand will also increase. And maybe using urban spaces for food production could be an alternative to avoid agricultural intensification and enhance urban biodiversity. Boom! what a combination! 😉Lettuce

Cuba is an example worth mentioning…Evidence shows that the country has 8000 agro-ecological gardens managed without any chemical pesticide or fertiliser. Such gardens promote the diversity of crops and species, recycle and uses local inputs, and produce considerable amounts of food. In the case of La Habana city, these agro-ecological systems provided with 8500 tons of food, including 7, 5 millions of eggs, and 3650 tons of meat in 1996. Not bad right?

In a pot, in a garden or in an allotment close to your place…lets’s do it!

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Urban biodiversity conservation

Why bother with urban biodiversity? … I can mention at least four reasons for knowing, caring and doing something to protect  all the species in our cities….

1.- cities offer an enormous niche and an opportunity for biodiversity conservation

2.-  urban settlements are inevitably growing in size and density and are one of the major threats to nature conservation.

3.- cities tend to be located in important biodiversity hotspots

4.- urban ecosystems provide a platform for citizens to understand the natural processes that govern global sustainability and provide them with several different social and psychological benefits.

Wanna do something about it? Get involved in urban planning and development in your home city! There is a lot of room for biologists, ecologist and conservationists in general. For example, green infrastructures such as green roofs and walls for food production, carbon sequestration, regulation of temperature could be the perfect scenario for the restoration of ecosystems, and the reintroduction of some native plants, birds, small mammals, insects that otherwise would not have a chance to co-exist with cities. It is true that many native species won’t resist to urban conditions but such technologies have the potential to restore the ecosystem’s functioning and to reconnect cities with the natural cycles.

How many species live next you? do you know them? Go out and explore!!!!! See below a beauty you can find in the North of Quito-Ecuador  😉

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Hope and innovation for conservation

There are great examples of successful conservation and sustainability efforts around the world that give us hope (Balmford, 2012; Bernard, 2010) and demonstrate that things can get better and will get better.IMG_0880 However, it is time to be honest in tackling the root causes of the problem from a conservation perspective.

Waste and our current consumption and production patterns are the major drivers for biodiversity loss, pollution, poverty, climate change (Orr, 1994).

What if we think  out-of the box for substituting something with nothing (Pauli, 2010)? and we create solutions that move away from pollution and waste and that use the resources that we already have?

The Blue Economy (Pauli, 2010) is a great example  showing that it IS possible to do so. In a nutshell, Gunther Pauli proposes the use of the waste produced by the coffee industry to grow mushrooms to feed vulnerable communities. Producers could grow coffee in a way that is compatible with biodiversity and responsible with the producer’s wellbeing. Responsible coffee drinkers could pay a fair price to producers, and in addition, new entrepreneurs could use the coffee waste to grow mushrooms to feed people (Pauli, 2010). The result would be that we wouldn’t need more land to grow more coffee or more resources for the creation of more goods, more jobs and more money. Check out more about this idea here.

With the same reasoning , there are many other examples of innovation in conservation. It is essential that we keep innovating our actions to tackle waste, production and consumption in the Anthropocene era (Steffen et al., 2011).  Keep checking the blog!!! new ideas coming soon… 🙂

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Reflections on being a conservation scientist by Isabel Vique

Conservation Leaders with DA

” … I now understand that conservation is much more than biology, even though biology is a key piece of the puzzle for conservation, and I believe I have the tools to inspire people to be passionate about nature. I believe I can make the difference in conservation.”

Read here what  my great friend and classmate Isabel Vique has to say about being a conservation scientist! 🙂

Isa Caro

Creative science communication

 

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Have you ever thought about how much scientific knowledge remains frozen in very complicated scientific papers?

Don’t you think that science could be way more accesible and FUN for everybody?

Well! The Cambridge “Pint of Science”  does a great job communicating science in a very lively way.  They bring together around 50 local artists that create an artwork related to the scientific talks held in pubs around the city of Cambridge, UK.IMG_5756

 

Last night, I had the chance to drink a pint at the Boathouse, discuss about climate change resilience in Quito , answer a pub quiz and present Wendy Bohme’s  amazing art piece inspired by my work. It was a great experience! What a fun way to communicate science! Don’t you think 😉 ?

 

The festival takes place in over 100 cities in 12 countries around the world during the course of the three days, 23-25 May. Find some interesting facts about the history of Pint of Science here. Check it out!

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#‎creativereactions‬ ‪#‎sciencecommunication‬ bringing together ‪#‎art‬ and‪#‎science‬ ‪#‎pintofscience‬ ‪#‎cambridge‬

 

No estaba muerto… andaba de parranda ;)

Increíble pero cierto! El Jambato negro del páramo de Ecuador que se pensaba estaba extinto fue recientemente encontrado! Lee más sobre la historia del Atelopus ignescens que resucitó aquí 

“Un apasionado cura Salesiano y una familia campesina, llenos de fé, sonaron las campanas que anunciaban la presencia del Jambatiug, Caballito de Dios o Castillo en tierras que por ahora conviene mantenerlas en el anonimato y que oportunamente serán conocidas. A su llamado acudimos, incrédulos, Giovanni Onore y el autor de este artículo, luego se sumó Elicio E. Tapia. Ahí estaba el jambatito negro azabache, tal y como lo vimos en aquellos tiempos de juventud” (Coloma, 2016).

 

 

‪#‎conservacion ‪#‎Ecuador